Monica O'Mullane

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Welcome to my website! This online space showcases my research projects, passions and publications, as well as my experiences as a researcher and involvement in local public health action.
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Monica

Marie Skłodowska-Curie Action (MSCA) Fellow,

Institute for Social Sciences in the 21st Century (ISS21), University College Cork, Ireland

m.omullane@ucc.ie


About

I am currently a Marie Skłodowska-Curie Action (MSCA) fellow, pursuing my fellowship (GendeResearchIreland) in the Institute for Social Science in the 21st Century (ISS21), University College Cork, a mobility fellowship kindly funded by the European Commission.

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News

Save the date! Friday 6th May 2022! GendeResearchIreland will be hosting an International Experts Panel, to be held in University College Cork (UCC). More information will be posted here at a later date. Feel contact me personally for more information.


In February 2021 I participated on an expert panel discussion on gender equality certification and the CASPER project, organised by Dr. Charikleia Tzanakou at the Centre for Diversity, Policy and Research Practice at Oxford Brookes University. You can watch the discussion here!


This year I published an article based on my theoretical framework with the Irish Journal of Sociology “Developing a theoretical framework for exploring the institutional responses to the Athena SWAN Charter in higher education institutions- A feminist institutionalist perspective”

I currently working on another article on the findings of one of my case studies.


Ben Cave and I co-wrote this article for RTÉ Brainstorm (a partnership between the Irish national broadcaster and research institutions)  What could we learn from a health impact assessment of Covid-19? The article gave an overview and analysis of the benefits in conducting a Health Impact Assessment (HIA) on the societal impact of the COVID-19 pandemic. The article includes key examples from Wales and Scotland where such HIAs on government responses to the pandemic have been carried out.


Denise Cahill (Coordinator of Cork Healthy Cities) and I co-wrote an article How to turn Cork into a healthy city. The article was an opportunity to share positive experience on developing local public health actions within the context of the W.H.O. designated Healthy Cities space. Key lessons from the work of Cork Healthy Cities were outlined (since it was set up in 2008) in maintaining and fostering meaningful action for public health: Foster a genuine spirit of partnership; Be open to emerging issues; Bring politicians on board; Make health everybody’s business; Build on an appetite for change; Put health and environment in all policies.


Upcoming book in 2022!

The Cork Healthy Cities project will celebrate ten years of WHO designation in 2022 and is delighted to collaborate to publish a book, Celebrating Ten Years of Cork Healthy Cities, marking the proud occasion. The book will be edited by Monica O’Mullane and Denise Cahill will be published to mark this occasion.


The School of Microbiology in UCC is commemorating  the memory of Professor Tadhg O’Mullane with the  Award for Academic Excellence. The first awardee (3rd year student BSc Microbiology) was presented the inaugural prize in 2021, with many more awardees to follow!

My grandparents Tadhg and Eileen (nee Barry) O’Mullane on their wedding day, 24th June 1945. They were married at the Honan Chapel UCC.


 


Publications

Integrating Health Impact Assessment with the Policy Process: Lessons and experiences from around the world

Edited by Monica O’Mullane

“The book is easy to read and can be dipped into for relevant chapters as independent pieces without needing to read the whole book in entirety. However chapters two and three are important to read as they remind you of the fundamental issues relating to health impact assessment e.g. the determinants of health and what health impact assessment actually means in realistic terms”

Dr. Rebecca Bailey-McHale, lecturer, Faculty of Health and Social Care, University of Chester, Nursing Times 2014

Available to buy today!

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Health Impact Assessment and Policy Development: Republic of Ireland and Northern Ireland

By Monica O’Mullane

This book provides the first analysis of how HIA cases have influenced local policy development throughout the island of Ireland using a unique conceptual lens drawing from the disciplines of the political, social and public health sciences.

Available to buy today!

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Research

I have an interdisciplinary educational and academic background in political science, social science, public health and health promotion. The consolidation of my educational background with my academic endeavours has refined my core research interest- a curiosity of political and social institutional drivers in a variety of contexts. Throughout my research studies, these drivers have been conceptualised and theorised as influencers of policy, organisational and cultural structures; in advancing contextualised public health action; and in shaping lived experiences. Here is an outline of my main research passions. Please refer to my research profile for a full list of publications and dissemination activities here. If you contact me by email I would be happy to share publications that are not available online or difficult to access.

For most of my research career I have conducted exploratory qualitative research studies. This has meant I have been reliant on research participant’s goodwill and generosity of spirit to engage in my research studies. A BIG THANK YOU to everyone I have ever interviewed as part of my research endeavours- I am eternally grateful for your input.


Institutional factors influencing the use of evidence and knowledge in policy development

 My doctoral work, An investigation of the utilisation of health impact assessments (HIAs) in Irish public policy making, was the beginning of my curiosity of the institutional and structural factors that influence the translation of evidence and knowledge into policy development.

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Health Impact Assessment and policy development: The Republic of Ireland and Northern Ireland (2015) published by Manchester University Press was based on my doctoral study of the use of Health Impact Assessment (HIA) to inform local policy development in the Republic of Ireland and Northern Ireland. In order to carry out data collection I got to travel and stay in  Dublin, Donegal, Derry/ Londonderry and Belfast. This book provides for the first time an analysis of how and why HIAs informed local policy development in both jurisdictions on the island of Ireland, with a specific focus on institutional factors influencing the use of evidence for local policy development. An original theoretical framework was used as the analytical lens for this exploration, drawing from the fields of political and social sciences, and public health. The HIA projects were conducted on traffic and transport, Traveller accommodation, urban redevelopment and air quality. I’m so happy to have published this monograph and have particularly happy memories of finalising it days before my divine daughter was born!

Other study outputs and publications:
  • O’Mullane, M. (2012) ‘Investigating HIA From a Politico-Administrative Perspective: A Theoretical Framework’International HIA Conference, Quebec, Canada. Invited Keynote speaker (31st August)
  • O’Mullane, M. (2010), ‘Institutional Influences on the Use of Evidence in Public Policy: The Case of Policy Formulation in Ireland,’ Studia Politica Slovaca, 3 (1)
  • O’Mullane, M. (2009) An investigation of the utilisation of health impact assessments (HIAs) in Irish public policy making. Thesis (Ph.D.) — Department of Government, University College Cork, National University of Ireland. http://cora.ucc.ie/handle/10468/798
  • O’Mullane, M. (2009), ‘The Case for Health Impact Assessment in Irish Public Policy’ Administration, Vol. 56, No. 4, pp. 87-109
  • O’Mullane, M. (2008), ‘Impact Assessment in Policy-Making Circles: A lot Done, More to do’, PolicyLink, Publication series of the Office of First Minister and Deputy First Minister (OFMDFM), Castle Buildings, Stormont, Belfast.
  • O’Mullane, M. (2008) ‘Are Health Impact Assessments (HIAs) Used for Policy in Ireland? Research Findings’, Second Meeting of the HIA Forum, hosted by the Irish Institute of Public Health, Prioritising Health in Policy and Project Appraisal, Jurys Hotel, Western Road, Cork .(11th November).
  • O’Mullane, M. (2008), “Left to Gather Dust on Shelves? The Role of Health Impact             Assessments in the Policy Process,” Irish Social Sciences Platform (ISSP)Summer School: Knowledge Society, Balanced Development and Sustaining Communities, Sligo June 23rd to 25th 2008.
  • O’Mullane, M. (2008), ‘Do Policy-Aiding Tools Inform the Policy Process? An Empirical Investigation into the Use of Health Impact Assessment (HIA) Knowledge in Ireland’Political Studies Association Ireland (PSAI) Postgraduate Conference, Department of Political Science and History, Trinity College Dublin. (April 26th)
  • O’Mullane, M. (2007), ‘The Role of Health Impact Assessment in Policy Formulation in Ireland’, Annual Political Studies Association of Ireland Conference, Dublin City University, October 20th-21st
  • O’Mullane, M. (2007), ‘Can HIA be embedded within Policy Formulation in Ireland?            An Investigation into the Utilisation of HIA Knowledge,’ 8th International Health Impact Assessment Conference, 15th-17th October, Dublin Castle. Hosted by the Irish Institute of Public Health.
  • O’Mullane, M. (2007), ‘The Case for Health Impact Assessment in the Realm of Evidence-Based Policy-Making,’Political Studies Association Ireland (PSAI) Postgraduate Conference, Department of Political Science and History,   Trinity College Dublin. (28th April)
  • O’Mullane, M. (2007) ‘Can Health Impact Assessments Influence the Policy-Making             Process in Ireland?’ Inaugural Meeting of the HIA Forum, hosted by the Irish        Institute of Public Health. Canal Court Hotel, Newry, County Down, Northern   Ireland. (24th April)
  • O’Mullane, M. (2007) ‘Utilisation of Health Impact Assessment (HIA) Knowledge in              Decision- Making: An Exploratory Study of Policy Formulation in Ireland,’            Central and Northern England Postgraduate (CANE) Conference, in       conjunction with the Political Studies Association (PSA). University of Newcastle. (20th January)
  • O’Mullane, M. (2006) ‘Is Irish Health Care Policy Inclined Towards ‘Boston’ or ‘Berlin’? The Role of the State in Health Care.’ Presented at the First European Consortium for Political Research (ECPR) Graduate Conference. University of Essex, Colchester (9th September)
  • O’Mullane, M. (2006), ‘Do Politicians Listen to Advice? A Research Framework.’ European Consortium for Political Research (ECPR), Summer School in       Research Methods: Interview Techniques and Expert Interviewing. University of Ljubljana, 7th August- 18th August.

Building on my intrigue of institutional factors affecting the policy use and impact of Health Impact Assessments (HIAs), and building on my doctoral study, I published an edited volume Integrating Health Impact Assessment with the Policy Process in 2013 with Oxford University Press. I edited this book of 18 chapters (four written by myself) with 35 contributors and seven reviewers. The book provides unique descriptions and analyses of country and regional specific Health Impact Assessment (HIA) research and practice. It is the only book available that provides an examination of research and practice in the relationship between HIA and public policy, from a global perspective. The book brings together a range of global experience and analysis of innovative and contextualised ways in which HIA processes and the evidence they provide have been integrated with policy development, drawing attention to the various drivers and institutional factors affecting this knowledge and evidence use.

Editing the book was an indescribably rewarding and learning experience. Collaborating with so many creative and enthusiastic public health experts who wrote such interesting chapters from around the world  was an honour and my total pleasure.

Here is a list of the chapters in the book and the chapter authors:

1. Introduction, Monica O’Mullane
2. Health Impact Assessment: The Conceptual Roots, Monica O’Mullane
3. The Policy Process and Health Impact Assessment, Monica O’Mullane
4. The Impact of HIA on the Policy-Making Process in Ireland: Northern Ireland and the Republic of Ireland, Claire Higgins, Owen Metcalfe, and Noelle Cotter
5. HIA implementation and public health policy systems in Slovakia and Denmark, Gabriel Gulis and Jana Kollarova
6. “Ruhr” metropolitan area in Germany – Rapid HIA of novel spatial planning, Rainer Fehr
7. HIA and its Role in Shaping Government Policy Making: The use of HIA at national policy level in England, Salim Vohra, Gifty Amo-Danso, and Judith Ball
8. HIA in the United States of America: Practice, Policy and Legal Underpinnings, Catherline L. Ross and Arthi Rao
9. “Learning by Doing”: Building Workforce Capacity to undertake HIA. An Australian Case Study, Elizabeth Harris, Ben Harris-Roxas, Patrick Harris, and Lynn Kemp
10. HIA in Local Government: The New Zealand Case, Louise Signal, Matthew Soeberg and Robert Quigley
11. A Decade of HIA Development in Thailand: From Cases to Constitution, Decharut Sukkumnoed
12. From instrument towards programmatic approach for Health in All Policies (HiAP) decision-support? Health Impact Assessment in the Netherlands, Marleen Bekker, Mieke Steenbakkers, Maria Jansen and Ilse Storm
13. Health in Impact Assessment and Emerging Challenges in India, Ben Cave, Urmila Jha-Thakur, Mala Rao, Pawan Labhasetwar, and Thomas Fischer
14. Realities and Opportunities for Health Impact Assessment in Africa, Francesca Viliani and Edith Clarke
15. Implementing and Institutionalising HIA in Spain: Challenges and Opportunities, Piedad Martin-Olmedo
16. Integrating Health into Impact Assessments in Scotland, Margaret Douglas, Susie Palmer and Martin Higgins
17. HIA in Colorado: A Tool Used to inform decision-making, Karen Roof
18. Lessons Learned from HIA Experience around the World: Where to Next?, Monica O’Mullane


Improving an integrated model of care- Exploring general practitioner (GP) perspectives of a national diabetes register in Ireland

This study was an interesting opportunity for me to explore the lived experience of GPs from all around Ireland in advance of the implementation of an integrated model of care for diabetes.

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Improving an integrated model of care- Exploring general practitioner (GP) perspectives of a national diabetes register in Ireland

With my educational background in political science and health promotion, I was delighted with the opportunity to work as a postdoctoral researcher on a Health Research Board Ireland (HRB) funded project (2008-2010) in the Department of General Practice UCC. It was a refreshing and interesting opportunity in particular for me to explore the lived experience of GPs delivering diabetes care from all around Ireland in advance of the implementation of an integrated model of care.

Publications from the consortium-led research study include the following:

  • Mc Hugh, S, O’Mullane, M, Perry, I., Bradley, C, (2014) ‘‘It sounds like a great idea but…’: a qualitative study of GPs’ attitudes towards the development of a national diabetes register’. BMJ Quality & Safety
  • O’Donnell, M., de Siun, A., O’Mullane, M., Smith, D., Bradley, C., Finucane, F.M. and Dineen, S.F. (2013) ‘Differences in the structure of outpatient diabetes care between endocrinologist-led and general physician-led services.’ BMC Health Services Research Journal. 13, 493
  • McHugh, S., O’Mullane, M., Perry, I. and Bradley, C. (2013) ‘Barriers and facilitators to introducing integrated diabetes care in Ireland: a qualitative study of views in general practice,’ BMJ Open, 3 (8) http://bmjopen.bmj.com/content/3/8/e003217.long
  • O’Mullane, M., McHugh, S. and Bradley, C. (2010), ‘Informing the development of a national diabetes register in Ireland: A literature review of the impact of patient registration on diabetes care,’ Informatics in Primary Care, 18 (3), 157-168.
  • McHugh, S., O’Keefe, J., Fitzpatrick, A., De Siun, A., O’Mullane, M., Perry, I and Bradley, C. (2009), ‘Diabetes Care in Ireland: A Survey of General Practitioners,’ Primary Care Diabetes, 3 (4) pp. 225-231

Institutional factors affecting the the implementation of a public health legal provision in Slovakia

Building on my doctoral study of institutional influences on the use of evidence and knowledge created from Health Impact Assessments (HIAs) across the island of Ireland, I took off to study a unique policy situation in Slovakia- one of the only countries in the world to legislate for HIA. 

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Institutional factors affecting the the implementation of a public health legal provision in Slovakia 3

Building on my doctoral study of institutional influences on the use of evidence and knowledge created from Health Impact Assessments (HIAs) across the island of Ireland, and my experience in exploring public health care (general practitioner) perspectives, I took off in 2010 to study a unique policy situation in Slovakia. It is one of the only countries in the world to legislate for HIA.  I was successful in attaining a SAIA national scholarship, to be hosted by the Institute of Political Science, Slovak Academy of Science, Bratislava, Slovakia.

The Public Health Act (2006) included a legal provision for the implementation of HIA across Slovakia, with particular reference to the role of the regional health authorities in rolling out this implementation. The study was published in Health Policy  Implementing the legal provisions for HIA in Slovakia: an exploration of practitioner perspectives (2014). Results showed that a number of respondents (statutory public health practitioners) were uncertain as to how HIA would be implemented in practice, with varying views on the technical and institutional barriers to comprehensive implementation of HIA. Although the public hygiene and sanitation networks in the public health system in Slovakia operate smoothly, the readiness of the public health infrastructure for HIA, which is based broadly on the social model of health, is dubious. Although HIA is contained within legislation, time will tell whether its implementation in practice will be as comprehensive as is hoped. Recommendations for further integration of HIA into the public health system include further training and education, national HIA resource centres and cross-country support. Following the implementation of the legal provision for HIA, I applied for a Certificate of Professional Competence in HIA from the Regional Public Health Authority Bratislava in 2012. Following an exam, I was successful in attaining the award. I am qualified to conduct an office HIA in the Slovak Republic and I look forward to using this qualification in practise.


My grandmother Ms Eileen Barry, Ballyclogh, Co Cork (later of Firgrove Gardens, Bishopstown, Cork) , graduating with a first class honours BA in French and Irish (UCC), 1944. I particularly love this photo because I am aware that very few women attended higher education in the 1940s, and so it was a major achievement for her to have done so. I also know that once she graduated and then married, she never had the opportunity to work as a teacher because of the marriage ban at the time in Ireland. What a stark reminder of the impact of social conservative policies and norms at that time.

Institutional factors affecting sustainable organisational change for gender equality, within the context of the academy

Evolving my ongoing interest in the various structural and institutional factors affecting the implementation of policies, development of patient registration systems in primary health care provision, and influencing the use of evidence for policy development, led me to turn my attention to such factors affecting the embedding of gender equality programmes that seek to address inequalities and systemic institutional inequities in career progression and development.

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Institutional factors affecting the embedding of sustainable organisational change for gender equality and in shaping lived experiences, within the context of the academy

Evolving my ongoing interest in the various structural and institutional factors affecting the implementation of policies, development of patient registration systems in primary health care provision, and influencing the use of evidence for policy development, led me to turn my attention to such factors affecting the embedding of gender equality programmes that seek to address inequalities and systemic institutional inequities in career progression and development.

My participation in the European Commission (EC) Framework Programme Seven (FP7) funded GENOVATE project (2013-2017) (Transforming Organisational Culture for Gender Equality in Research and Innovation) was nothing short of an awesome experience! Incredible for the research learning and opportunity it opened up for me, as well as the good fortune to meet and collaborate with such motivated and lovely European partners, particularly Professor Uduak Archibong, Pro Vice Chancellor (Equality, Diversity & Inclusion) University of Bradford.

My involvement in GENOVATE on behalf of Trnava University came about through my connection with Dr Caitríona Ní Laoire in UCC. I was working at the time in the Department of Public Health, Faculty of Health Care and Social Work, Trnava University, Trnava, Slovakia. There was a consortium consisting of seven partner universities [University of Bradford, UK, University College Cork, Ireland, Lulea University of Technology, Sweden, Università degli Studi di Napoli, Italy, Ankara University, Turkey, Trnava University in Trnava, Slovakia] supported by on-going participatory evaluation undertaken by University of Madrid (Universidad Complutense de Madrid), Spain. The project involved six partner universities creating and implementing contextualised Gender Equality Action Plans (GEAPs) interlinked with the development of eight different Work Packages. I was scientific coordinator of the Slovak team before going on maternity and parent leave. On behalf of Trnava University I was mostly involved in the development of the GENOVATE Model for Gender Equality in Transforming Research and Innovation, informed in part by our research study of eliciting partner’s experiences implementing the GEAPs and engaging in the project consortium with guided reflections.

The GENOVATE model was founded on the social model of equality, which acknowledges society as the main determining factor to inequality and therefore that equality can only be realised through structural or systemic change. GENOVATE therefore prioritised actions that promoted and fostered structural and cultural change within the partner institutions.

Research publications with my participation:

GendeResearchIreland

Exploring gender equality in Irish higher education: Qualitative case-study research into the response to, and process of, Athena SWAN

(2018-2022)

Hosted by the Institute for Social Science in the 21st Century (ISS21), University College Cork (UCC), Cork, Ireland. Funded under the Marie Skłodowska-Curie Action Individual Fellowship.

This project has received funding from the European Union’s Horizon 2020 research and innovation programme under the Marie Skłodowska-Curie grant agreement number 750408. My work in GENOVATE prompted my intrigue in the process of implementing gender equality initiatives in addressing structural inequalities within the context of the academy. With the insightful and supportive guidance of Dr Caitríona Ní Laoire as my proposed project mentor in ISS21 UCC, I conceptualised an application for the European Commission funded Marie Skłodowska-Curie Action individual fellowship, which supports mobility of researchers within the EU and associated areas. I had actually applied for the fellowship in 2011, and at that time did not succeed. Looking back now I am definitely glad that I was not successful at that time, as only one fellowship per person is allowed. I was much happier to find out that my proposal for this GendeResearchIreland project was successful. To read more about this ongoing exciting fellowship please click here.


Institutional factors shaping the sustaining of localised public health efforts in tackling health inequalities

With my background in political science I headed off in 2004 to study health promotion in Galway.My Masters in Health Promotion (2005) was the first time I learned about the social determinants of health, and how the settings in which we live, work and play influence our health. It all hit me like a bolt of lightening and I have not stopped since being intrigued about ways and structural approaches to tackle health inequalities and improve population health.

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Institutional factors shaping the sustaining of localised public heath efforts in tackling health inequalities

With my background in political science I headed off in 2004 to study health promotion in Galway.My Masters in Health Promotion (2005) was the first time I learned about the social determinants of health, and how the settings in which we live, work and play influence our health. It all hit me like a bolt of lightening and I have not stopped since being intrigued about ways and structural approaches to tackle health inequalities and improve population health.

Planters on the boardwalk in Cork installed as part of the Healthy Cities project

While working in the Department of General Practice in UCC in 2008 I was blessed to have been a founding member of the Cork Healthy Cities group.  I am currently academic representative on the Cork Healthy Cities steering group and co-editor (with the formidable Denise Cahill, Coordinator of Cork Healthy Cities) of forthcoming book Celebrating Ten Years of Cork Healthy Cities, 2022.

Being involved in Cork Healthy Cities has really opened my eyes to intersectoral policy impact on public health. My participation on the Steering Group constantly reminds me that health is a right of all, and that the inclusion of marginalised voices in particular around the project table of any intersectoral endeavour is key to meaningful success and sustainability. The next ten year action plan for Cork Healthy Cities is an ambitious one to tackle health inequalities in Cork. I am hoping the plan’s inclusion and promotion of Health Impact Assessment (HIA) will lead to an increase in the use of the tool, an endeavour I would be happy to be engaged.

Enjoying a movement break during the project summer school in Slovenia (2012)

ACTION-FOR-HEALTH: Reducing Health Inequalities by preparation for action plans and structural funds projects

I was team lead for a European Commission funded ACTION-FOR-HEALTH project which ran from 2012 to 2014 (before going on maternity leave), funded specifically by DG SANCO. More information on the project is available here.  This was a brilliant pan-European collaboration to be involved in as the topic was one close to my own personal interests (tackling health inequalities). It allowed me to explore public health action in beautiful Trnava where I worked in Trnava University, Slovakia; brought me to Slovenia to meet with European project partners and the Slovene project coordinators; and it also allowed me to present at the EcCoWell Conference held in Cork in 2013. Here I am ready for the conference outside Cork City Hall.


Integrating Research, Teaching and Learning- My experience

I’ve always loved teaching once I’ve had the time and space to prepare and deliver curricula properly. I’ve a broad range of teaching experience plus I have been blessed with opportunities to pursue research on the integration of teaching, research and learning.

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Integrating Research, Teaching and Learning- My experience

I have always loved teaching once I’ve had the time and space to prepare and deliver curricula. I have a broad range of teaching experience plus I have been blessed with opportunities to pursue research on the integration of teaching, research and learning. Here is a brief overview of my teaching experience to date:

  • Tutoring in local government as part of the BSc Government and Politics degree (2005-2008)
  • Lecturing in health care management 2007, as part of the MSc in Healthcare Management, now known as the MSc Healthcare Leadership UCC
  • Delivering lectures in Health Impact Assessment (HIA) to MPH UCC students (2008-2010; 2018-….), as well as to Masters and Bachelor students in Trnava University (2010-2014).
  • Lecturer for modules on Government Structure and Irish Politics on the Higher Diploma in Public Relations and Journalism, as coordinated by the Irish Academy for Public Relations Ireland (2006-2008)
  • In Trnava University for the Public Health Bachelor, Masters and Doctoral programmes I also delivered and coordinated modules in Health Determinants and Health Inequalities; Research Methods; Health Promotion- Programme Design, Implementation and Evaluation
  • Contributing to modules on Irish Politics and European Politics at the College of Saint Rose, Albany, USA (2006)
  • Delivering and coordinating the Certificate in Political Issues and Community Action (2006-2008), Department of Government and Politics, UCC, a programme delivered to members of the refugee and asylum seeking community.
  • Delivering the Social Policy Analysis module on behalf of the School of Applied Social Studies (UCC) to Government students, 2020
  • I worked as an English language teacher in Slovakia, first teaching adults in the Canadian School in Trnava and then teaching children (between 6 and 13 years) in a bilingual Slovak English primary school, BESST. These were positive opportunities to meet new people, gain some additional teaching experience, and most importantly,  an opportunity to teach lovely children <3

Integrating Research, Teaching and Learning in a Multicultural Setting (2009)

I collaborated with colleagues from the Department of Government and Politics UCC (Dr Clodagh Harris, Dr Theresa Reidy and Dr Fiona Buckley) on a National Academy for the Integration of Research, Teaching and Learning (NAIRTL) funded project entitled: Integrating Research, Teaching and Learning in a Multicultural Setting: Developing a FETAC level 6 Certificate in political issues and community action for the immigrant community in 2009.

Within this project we developed a credited UCC programme as an access route for non-traditional students; developed inter culturally-appropriate assessments for the programme; organised seminars with the wider community of stakeholders including nationally-recognised curriculum specialists. Together we also co-authored this publication (‘Developing a political science curriculum for non-traditional students,’) for the journal of European Political Science.

CABIS-IDA: Capacity Building of Human Resources for Health in Slovakia for International Development Aid (2012-2013)

Whilst working in the Department of Public Health, Trnava University I participated in this European Commission funded project, financed under the EC Lifelong Learning Programme, as part of the Leonardo Da Vinci, Transfer of Innovation Project. The project entailed developing a curriculum for global and development education in Slovakia. I coordinated the Community Development module as part of this project. We published this article also Development Education at University level in Slovakia: Experiences and Challenges in the journal Policy & Practice: A Development Education Review

Postgraduate Certificate in Teaching and Learning in Higher Education (2020)

In 2020 I graduated with the PG Cert in Teaching and Learning in Higher Education, Centre for the Integration of Research, Teaching and Learning (CIRTL), UCC. The course was a really positive experience and an opportunity to learn new teaching and learning methodology, as well as space to reflect on my own methods and approaches to learning journeys. I have never taken for granted all the opportunities I have been given to engage with students. This course has only increased my teaching and learning skillset as well as my confidence as an educator and learner.

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